How to Improve Your Commute


When your commute is less than ideal, it can affect more than just your mood; it can also have a negative impact on your health. A study of over 16,000 people found that commuters with long, stressful commutes were more likely to have high blood pressure and diabetes. (Even a two-minute commute can feel like an eternity if traffic is bad.) Making your drive a little easier and more enjoyable can help you stay focused while you’re on the road and help you wind down when you get home. Here are some ways to make your commute a little less stressful and a whole lot more enjoyable.

As the weather gets warmer, you may be looking forward to longer days and the chance to get outdoors. Unfortunately, this also means that your drive to and from work will happen in the dark. The key to a safe and comfortable commute has the right equipment. Make sure you have a clean, well-lit car with a full tank of gas and a good working stereo so you can enjoy your favorite music on the drive home.

It’s one of the biggest time sucks in your life: the daily commute. The average American spends more than half an hour each day getting to and from work. That adds up to more than an hour each week—and more than five hours each month. But all that time spent in the car doesn’t have to be wasted time. Just by taking a few simple steps to improve your commute, you can reduce the stress and anxiety that can come with a long drive and make your entire day a little more enjoyable.

  • Listen to music

Are you sick of those long, tedious commutes? The daily traffic and bumper-to-bumper drives can make you dread going to work in the morning. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to improve your commute and make the most of the time you spend in the car. We’ll help you with all of your daily commute needs so you can spend your time doing the things you love instead of fighting traffic.

  • Leave early

You’re late for work. Again. Traffic was brutal, and you’re stressed about being late, so you race through the door and head straight to your desk. You’re upset and distracted – which affects your job performance. You make mistakes and are more likely to make errors that could potentially cause injury or death to yourself or others. Leaving for work earlier can help prevent this. Yes, you lose a little sleep, but the benefits may be worth it.

  • Sit in Silence

Although sitting in the car and driving more than two hours a day can feel like a prison sentence, most commuters don’t have the freedom to work with a flexible schedule. However, there are a few things you can do to make your long commute a little more tolerable.

First, you should try to avoid driving during rush hour. Leaving in the early morning or late evening can help mitigate heavy traffic, and it can save you money on gas too. Next, make sure to have a few podcasts, audiobooks, or audiobooks loaded on your phone. Also, consider calming music—anything that will help you stay focused. Finally, if you have the room, bring a pillow or blanket to keep you comfortable on those long drives

  • Mix your route once in a while

You can’t get out of traffic jams by sitting in them. Mix up your commute schedule once in a while to avoid becoming too predictable to your fellow commuters. If you typically take the same route to work, vary it by a few blocks. If you typically drive by the same coffee shop each morning, try working a different route. You may not save any time, but you’ll make your morning commute less predictable to other drivers, and that will help keep you safe.

With today’s tech-savvy society, there’s an app for everything. So, what about improving your commute, the most important part of your day? The idea of commuting is negative for most of us, but it doesn’t have to be. If you rely on a car to get you to and from work each day, you’ve probably found that you’re using a lot of gas and spending a lot of money on car maintenance.

For many people, driving to work in a car is a necessity. But long commutes can be stressful, and driving in heavy traffic can be particularly nerve-wracking. Thankfully, you don’t have to be at the mercy of the traffic gods every day. There are steps you can take to make your commute easier. Traffic usually moves more quickly during off-peak hours, so you might consider leaving for work earlier in the morning or later in the evening. You can also drive during the week, rather than during rush hour if that’s an option. If you can work from home occasionally, that can be a big help, too.

 

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